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Changes in internal water status and the gas exchange of leaves in response to ambient evaporative demand



Changes in internal water status and the gas exchange of leaves in response to ambient evaporative demand



Plant response to climatic factors Proceedings of the Uppsala symposium: 243-247



In experiments with sunflower and Phaseolus vulgaris plants, relative turgor was found to decrease with increasing moisture concentration difference between the leaf and air, even though the roots were adequately supplied with water in the soil. Turgor values varied in the range 92-68% for P. vulgaris and 91-78% for sunflower, with moisture concentration differences varying between 10 and 29 X 10-6 g water/cm3 air. P. vulgaris plants exhibited wilting symptoms around a relative turgor of 70%.

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