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Comparison of peat and bark-humus in greenhouse and outdoor vegetable culture


, : Comparison of peat and bark-humus in greenhouse and outdoor vegetable culture. Acta Horticulturae (26): 69-73

Trials were carried out with tomato, silver onion, radish, cabbage, leek, celeriac, carrot, pea, cauliflower, fennel, marjoram and spearmint to study the effect on the field and greenhouse yields of these crops of the substrates peat, bark humus, sand/bark humus, sand and soil. Tomatoes gave higher yields when grown in peat or bark humus than in soil. In a warm summer, field crops grown on peat at 2 sites gave higher yields than greenhouse crops.


Accession: 000046513

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