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Different levels of linoleic acid in the diet to pigs. 1. Changes in the fatty acid composition of lipids from plasma, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle during the growth period



Different levels of linoleic acid in the diet to pigs. 1. Changes in the fatty acid composition of lipids from plasma, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle during the growth period



Zeitschrift fur Tierphysiologie Tierernahrung und Futtermittelkunde 31(6): 317-332



1. Twelve castrated male Landrace pigs were given a semipurified diet with or without 5.3% soya bean oil which contained 55% linoleic acid. Both groups received the same daily amounts of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins, including 20 mg alpha -tocopheryl acetate, and either 6.4 or 0.4% of total energy as linoleic acid. Pigs were weaned at 17 to 18 kg. Blood and biopsy samples of backfat and longissimus dorsi muscle were taken before the start of feeding and after 40, 80 and 120 days for estimation by weight of total lipids and of fatty acid composition of lipids by gas chromatography. **1AFatty acid composition of plasma and tissues of the 2 groups differed considerably at the start of the experiment. Total plasma lipid concentrations did not change during the growth period either within or between groups. Total lipids in backfat and in longissimus dorsi increased significantly during the period in both groups; the increases were greater in pigs given soya bean oil. In plasma and tissue lipids of pigs not given oil, C16:1, C18:1 and C20:3 acids were greater and C16:0, C18:0 and C18:2 were less than in the samples from pigs given oil. In pigs given oil concentrations of linoleic and arachidonic acids declined during growth; C20:3 omega 9 could not be detected. In the deprived pigs changes in fatty acid composition differed between tissues and were not always in the same direction, showing that fatty acid composition of plasma lipids is not indicative of fatty acid status of any particular tissue or organ. Ratio of C18:1 to C18:2 appeared to reflect other factors in addition to the effect of dietary linoleic acid on the tissues and cannot therefore be taken to indicate the essential fatty acid status of the body. Increase in ratio of C20:3 to C20:4 was significant only for longissimus dorsi lipids and could not be detected in backfat.

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Accession: 000061210

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 4795215

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0396.1973.tb01293.x



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