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Respiration measurements in various kinds of vegetables and fruit during storage under increased CO2 and reduced O2 concentrations


, : Respiration measurements in various kinds of vegetables and fruit during storage under increased CO2 and reduced O2 concentrations. Acta Horticulturae (38): 83-87

Measurements were made of the respiration rates of cauliflowers, carrots, lettuces and green bananas in various CO2/O2 combinations.

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Related references

Bohling H.; Hansen H., 1974: Respiration measurements in various kinds of vegetables and fruit during storage under increased carbon di oxide and reduced oxygen concentrations. Acta Horticulturae (Wageningen) 1(38): 83-87

Esposito, K.; Giugliano, D., 2011: Increased consumption of green leafy vegetables, but not fruit, vegetables or fruit and vegetables combined, is associated with reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes. Evidence-Based Medicine 16(1): 27-28

Takama, F.; Saito, S., 1971: Studies on the storage of vegetables and fruits. I. The effect of temperature on respiration rates of vegetables and fruit in storage. Carrots, tomatoes and broccoli were enclosed in desiccators and the air was replaced once every 24h. CO2 output was greater and quality was poorer in a desiccator stored at room temperature than in one stored at about 4 deg C.

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Honda Y.; Ishiguro O., 1967: Studies on the storage of fruits and vegetables i the effect of the composition of atmospheric gases on the respiration of fruits and vegetables during storage i. Journal of the Japanese Society for Horticultural Science 36(3): 363-372

Honda, Y.; Ishiguro, O., 1967: Studies on the storage of fruits and vegetables. I. The effects of different levels of gases in the storage atmosphere on the respiration of fruits and vegetables. The respiration rates of numerous vegetables, , strawberries and Japanese pears were investigated in CA storage and in air. The rate was lower in CA than in air for aubergines, Japanese pears, spinach and cauliflowers; in an atmosphere of 5% Oa an...

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