+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Effective heat content of green forest fuels



Effective heat content of green forest fuels



Forest Science 23(1): 81-89



Unextracted, ether extracted and benzene-ethanol extracted foliage samples of Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa), Aspen (Populus tremuloides), Gallberry (Ilex glabra), Manzanita (Arctostaphylos totula) and Saw-Palmetto (Serenoa repens) were analysed by thermal evolution analysis, GLC and thermogravimetric analysis, to determine their effective heat content (heat released by combustion of evolved gases) and gasification profiles (the rate of heat release as a function of temperature). The total amount of extractives for the broadleaf species varied from 13 to 45%, but was approx. 30% for the coniferous species. The amount of benzene-ethanol extractives was higher, but their C and H content was lower, than that of ether extractives. Gasification occurred between 100 and 500 deg C, most of the combustion gases below 300 deg originating from benzene-ethanol extractives, whereas above 300 deg C the major sources of combustible volatiles were ether extractives and cell wall components. It is considered that both types of extractives could play a significant role in initiation of combustion at lower temperatures, ether extractives also being important in increasing the intensity of fire at the higher temperatures.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 000358914

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

The moisture content of forest fuels in Greece. Das. Chron, 10: 8/9, 23-26, 1969

Influence of moisture content on the flammability of some forest fuels. Translation, Fisheries and Environment Canada (OOENV TR-1580): 18, 1979

Estimating moisture content of heavy forest fuels. Forest Science 21(2): 135-139, 1975

The moisture content of forest fuels. II. Comparison of moisture content variations above the fibre saturation point between a number of fuel types. Inform. Rep. For. Fire Res. Inst., Ottawa. FF-X-15, 68, 1968

The moisture content of forest fuels. I. A review of basic concepts. Inform. Rep. For. Fire Res. Inst., Ottawa. FF-X-14, 47, 1968

The use of statistical analysis for investigating the moisture content of forest fuels. Dokl Mosk s kh akad im KA Timiryazeva (208): 219-223, 1975

A method for describing equilibrium moisture content of forest fuels. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 14(4): 597-600, 1984

The moisture content of forest fuels i a review of the basic concepts. Canada Department of Forestry & Rural Development Forestry Branch Information Report FF-X (14): 1-47, 1968

Seasonal variations in ash content of some Michigan forest floor fuels. Research Note, North Central Forest Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service (NC-279): 3, 1982

The moisture content of forest fuels ii comparison of moisture content variations above the fiber saturation point between a number of fuel types pine g maple d grass m. Canada Department of Forestry & Rural Development Forestry Branch Information Report FF-X (15): 1-68, 1968

The moisture content of forest fuels. III. Moisture content variations below the fibre saturation point. Inform. Rep. For. Fire Res. Inst., Ottawa. FF-X-16, 62, 1968

Role of foliar moisture content in the silvicultural management of forest fuels. Western Journal of Applied Forestry 21(4): 228-231, 2006

Determining the moisture content of some dead forest fuels using a microwave oven. USDA Forest Service research note INT: 80 (277), 1980

Effect of humidity on timelag and equilibrium moisture content of forest fuels. Journal of Northeast Forestry University 35(5): 44-46, 2007

Moisture content of fine forest fuels and fire occurrence in central Portugal. International Journal of Wildland Fire 2(2): 69-86, 1992