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Effects of concentration, weather and periodicity of application of certain fungicides on Septoria lycopersici (Speg), leaf blotch disease of tomato at Nsukka, Nigeria






Acta Horticulturae (53): 64-70

Effects of concentration, weather and periodicity of application of certain fungicides on Septoria lycopersici (Speg), leaf blotch disease of tomato at Nsukka, Nigeria

Concentrations of 1 g/l of Caocobre Sandoz (cuprous oxide) or Dithane M-45 (mancozeb) were as effective as those of 4 g/l for control of S. lycopersici on tomatoes but weekly applications were significantly more effective than those every 2 or 4 weeks.


Accession: 000360329



Related references

Okpala E.U., 1977: Effects of concentration weather and periodicity of application of certain fungicides on septoria lycopersici leaf blotch disease of tomato at nsukka nigeria. Acta Horticulturae (Wageningen) 53: 64-70

Marcinkowska, J., 1977: Septoria leaf spot of tomato. III. Pathogenicity of Septoria lycopersici Speg. and the susceptibility of tomato to this fungus. In glasshouse inoculation tests with 20 isolates from different localities the disease appeared at the same time on tomato plants at different stages of development though the lesions were larger on older plants than on 1-week-old seedlings. On av...

Marcinkowska, J., 1977: Septoria leaf spot of tomato. II. Morphology and development of Septoria lycopersici Speg. Hyphae of S. lycopersici in infected plants and in culture gradually became wider, darker and more branched. On culture media pycnidia were formed in stromata, in plants in necrotic tissues. Linear growth of the fungus was best on tomato leaf extr...

Marcinkowska, J., 1977: Septoria leaf spot of tomato. IV. Overwintering of Septoria lycopersici Speg. and viability of its pycnospores. S. lycopersici overwinters as pycnospores from pycnidia on diseased tomato leaves and stems. The fungus can remain alive on plant debris left on the soil surface or buried. Pycnospores on plant debris in the soil can infect tomato plants in centra...

Patil, K.S., 1978: Studies on leaf spot disease of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) caused by Septoria lycopersici Speg. in Karnataka. This information is noticed elsewhere.

Stanton, W.R., 1960: Notes on Tomato leaf spot caused by Septoria lycopersici Speg. A frequent limiting factor in the cultivation of rain-grown tomatoes in the region is the development on the leaves of S. lycopersici, which may attack plants of any age. Fruits and stems are rarely affected, but the diseased leaves dry and expose...

Pritchard, F.J.; Porte, W.S., 1924: The relation of temperature and humidity to Tomato leaf spot (Septoria lycopersici Speg.). The temperature relations of the leaf spot fungus of tomatoes (Septoria lycopersici) were determined in culture by means of a Paul Altmann's incubator. The culture media used were corn-meal and cornmeal agar. The minimum temperature for growt...

Kurozawa, C., 1972: Variability of Septoria lycopersici Speg., the causal agent of tomato leaf spot. No resistance was found in the commercial varieties tested but it existed in Lycopersicon glandulosum PI126448 and PI126440) and L. peruvianum **PI126441, PI212407, PI251311, PI143679 and T55). Several species introduced as resistant were suscepti...

Kurozawa, C.; Balmer, E., 1975: Variability of Septoria lycopersici Speg., causal agent of tomato leaf spot. In a study of six isolates and four hosts (three resistant wild species and one susceptible variety), significant differences were noted for isolates, hosts and their interaction. Differences in the degree of pathogenicity were attributed to the d...

Potter, Hs, 1982: Aerial application vs. fungigation for control of tomato disease, 1981 Tomato (Lycoperiscon esculentum C-37), early blight; Alternaria solani, septoria leaf spot; Septoria lycopersici, bacterial leaf spot; Xanthomonas vesicatoria, anthracnose; Colletotrichum phomoides. Fungicide and nematicide tests results American Phytopathological Society7(37): 87