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Influence of temperature, photoperiod and container size on the growth rate and development of tomato plants in growing-rooms


, : Influence of temperature, photoperiod and container size on the growth rate and development of tomato plants in growing-rooms. Acta Horticulturae (51): 77-87

The factors investigated were photoperiod (12 h versus 16 h), temperature (a constant 21 deg C versus a differential day/night regime with a mean of 21 deg ), and container size (use of a 10.8 cm container continuously versus a 3.5 cm container for the first 10 days and thereafter a 10.8 cm container). Growth curves based on dry weight samples at 3-4 day intervals showed an overall increase of 43% with the 16-h photoperiod after 20 days.


Accession: 000407910

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