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Natural science and economic progress in a context of commercial horticulture


, : Natural science and economic progress in a context of commercial horticulture. Acta Horticulturae (40): 13-23

Science and economics are two most powerful forces in the economy: it is time their tendency to separate existence was examined. In some circumstances they are seen to be integrated: but in horticulture there is no integrator and the two disciplines do not naturally converge. Scientists in horticulture have cause to mistrust or negate applied economics on its past record.

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