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Response of squash to ethylene and chilling



Response of squash to ethylene and chilling



Annals of Applied Biology 87(3): 465-469



Freshly harvested but already cured fruits of squash (Cucurbita pepo Acorn) were stored for 4 weeks at 20, 15, 10, 5 and 0 deg C, with or without 5 mu litre/litre ethylene. Ethylene had no significant effect on overall acceptability, weight loss, dry matter and ion leakage, but enhanced respiration at 15 and 20 deg. Temperature had a significant effect on weight loss, dry matter and overall acceptability.

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Accession: 000485985

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7348.1977.tb01911.x



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