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Spectral sensitivity of monpolar cells in the bee lamina


, : Spectral sensitivity of monpolar cells in the bee lamina. Journal of Comparative Physiology, A 93: 337-346

The intracellular response of the lamina monopolar cells (MC) to retinal illumination was recorded for a series of intensity and spectral runs in nine cells. Spectral sensitivity of the MC was maximal at 482 nm, with a broad shoulder around 550 nm. Sensitivity was low (20%) in the UV region. In some cells there was an increase in sensitivity at the shortest wavelength tested (316 nm), and one cell responded only to UV wavelengths at high intensities.

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Menzel, R., 1974: Spectral sensitivity of mono polar cells in the bee lamina. Journal of Comparative Physiology A Sensory Neural and Behavioral Physiology 93(4): 337-346

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