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Ascorbic acid in vegetables grown at different temperatures


, : Ascorbic acid in vegetables grown at different temperatures. Acta Horticulturae (93): 425-433

Determined in 8 vegetable crops, including chicory, spinach beet and parsley, grown at 5 different temperatures (12 deg to 24 deg C).


Accession: 000600977

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Related references

Kawerau, E., 1944: Ascorbic acid. Part 3: The ascorbic acid content of fruits and vegetables grown in Eire. The results of analyses of Irish grown fruits and vegetables for vitamin C content are presented. Special attention has been paid to potatoes, rose hips and blackcurrants.

Kawerau, E., 1944: Ascorbic acid. 3. The ascorbic acid content of fruits and vegetables grown in Eire. With the indophenol method of estimation the ascorbic acid content of a number of Irish grown fruits and vegetables was examined, special attention being paid to potatoes, rose hips and blackcurrants. For the best retention of vitamin C during coo...

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