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Cultivation aspects of Catharanthus roseus for roots


, : Cultivation aspects of Catharanthus roseus for roots. Acta Horticulturae (73): 263-268

The results of trials with C. roseus at 3 sites showed that maximum root and ajmalicine yields were obtained after approximately 7 months of growth at a density of about 400 000 plants/ha in spaced rows. A dry soil moisture regime significantly decreased total root and ajmalicine yields, but increased ajmalicine content in the roots compared with plants grown under high soil moisture conditions. Phosphorus and nitrogen were found to be essential for intensive root and shoot growth.


Accession: 000625197

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Related references

Dematte, M.; Haag, H.; Vasques, L., 1987: Mineral nutrition of ornamental plants. XI. Deficiencies of macronutrients and boron in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and Catharanthus roseus f. albus (Sweet) G. Don. Anais da Escola Superior de Agricultura "Luiz de Queiroz"4(1): 419-433

Dematte, M.E.S.P.; Haag, H.P.; Vasques, L.H., 1987: Mineral nutrition of ornamental plants. XI. Deficiency of macronutrients and of boron in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and Catharanthus roseus f. albus (Sweet) G. Don. The pink- and white-flowering types, cultivated as ornamental plants, were grown in nutrient solutions deficient in N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S or B. Symptoms of deficiency are described for each element.

Kartmazova, L.S.; Lyapunova, P.M., 1976: The cultivation of the rose catharanthus roseus in kharkov. The cultivation and developmental morphology of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae), a source for antineoplastic drugs, in Kharkov [Ukrainian SSR, USSR] were described. Chromatogrpahic analysis showed that the alkaloid content, based on absolute dry...

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Pereira,D.M.; Faria,J.; Gaspar,L.; Ferreres,F.; Valentao,P.; Sottomayor,M.; Andrade,P.B., 2010: Exploiting Catharanthus roseus roots source of antioxidants. <i>Catharanthus roseus</i> is among the most important medicinal plants, mainly due to its anticancer alkaloids. Phenolics and organic acids were studied in this plant's roots, using HPLC-MS and HPLC-UV, respectively. Neither phen...

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Wang, C-Hua.; Wang, G-Cai.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, X-Qi.; Huang, X-Jun.; Ye, W-Cai., 2012: Three new monomeric indole alkaloids from the roots of Catharanthus roseus. Two new alkaloid glycosides (1 and 2) and a new monomeric indole alkaloid (3), together with 13 known ones (4-16), were isolated from the roots of Catharanthus roseus. The structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of the spectroscop...

Islas Flores, I.; Moreno Valenzuela, O.; Minero Garcia, Y.; Loyola Vargas, V.M.; Miranda Ham, M.D.L.urdes, 2002: Tryptophan decarboxylase from transformed roots of Catharanthus roseus. Tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC, EC 4.1.1.28) from Catharanthus roseus hairy roots was purified 80-fold. Antibodies against TDC were obtained and they recognized only one protein of 55 kDa in crude extracts from hairy root cultures. Elicitation of t...

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