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Controlled comparison of Cheddar cheese made with bulk starter and frozen concentrated direct-to-the-vat starter. Yield, sensory, proteolytic, lipolytic and bacteriological aspects



Controlled comparison of Cheddar cheese made with bulk starter and frozen concentrated direct-to-the-vat starter. Yield, sensory, proteolytic, lipolytic and bacteriological aspects



Proceedings from the first biennial Marschall International Cheese Conference: ; 473-494



Total manufacturing time from renneting to milling was about 26 min longer for Cheddar cheeses made with Superstart direct to the vat starter than with Marstar bulk starter. This is explained by the higher acidity in the Marstar cheeses during the initial manufacturing stages. Total bacterial counts increased markedly in Superstart cheeses between renneting and packing, resulting in more acid production so that it was similar in both types of cheese at the milling stage.

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Accession: 000848170

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