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Host plant associations, diversity and species-area relationships of mesophyll-feeding leafhoppers of trees and shrubs in Britain



Host plant associations, diversity and species-area relationships of mesophyll-feeding leafhoppers of trees and shrubs in Britain



Ecological Entomology, 63: 217-238



A total of 62 British species of Typhlocybine leafhoppers are known to feed on the leaf-mesophyll tissue of trees and shrubs. British host records for 55 of these are given. The leafhopper faunas of 36 spp. of native and introduced trees and shrubs are described. The Shannon-Wiener equation was used to calculate species diversity for adult samples collected from 20 different species at 16 different localities in Wales, southern England and northern Scotland. Sorensen's coefficients were calculated for rearing data from Britain generally and subjected to cluster analysis. Most trees have low similarities with respect to leafhopper faunas and are distinct. Taxonomic relationships of trees appear relatively unimportant in determining the similarities of their leafhooper faunas. Using the same data, species-area relationships were calculated for 34 different tree and shrub species and their associated leaf-hoppers. A significant regression was obtained, but it explained only 16% of the variation. It is suggested that host plant range is relatively unimportant in determining the numbers of these species associated with different trees in Britain. Some introduced species of trees, particularly the recently planted Nothofagus, have acquired large leafhopper faunas.

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Accession: 000903126

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