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Host tree influences on the dispersal of first instar gypsy moths, Lymantria dispar (L.)



Host tree influences on the dispersal of first instar gypsy moths, Lymantria dispar (L.)



Ecological Entomology 6(4): 411-416



In laboratory tests, 1st instar gypsy moths attempted dispersal with more frequency when exposed to less acceptable foliage. First instars from small eggs attempted dispersal less frequently than larvae from large eggs when exposed to foliage from highly acceptable or marginally acceptable hosts. Dispersal rates of larvae from medium sized eggs were intermediate. These results confirm and expand upon the findings of Capinera and Barbosa (1976). In the field, data on the relative densities of larvae on different host species support the conclusion that the frequency of dispersal attempts is inversely related to host acceptability. The implications of these findings for the population dynamics of the gypsy moth are discussed.

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Accession: 000903229

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2311.1981.tb00632.x



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