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Changes of a wild ecotype of the olive fruit fly during adaptation to lab rearing


Fruit flies of economic importance Proceedings of the CEC/IOBC International Symposium, Athens, Greece, 16-19 November 1982: 416-422
Changes of a wild ecotype of the olive fruit fly during adaptation to lab rearing
A laboratory colony of Dacus oleae (Gmel.) initiated from adults that emerged from olives collected in the field in Greece took about 3-4 generations to adapt to laboratory rearing. Less than 50% of females oviposited in the 1st 2 generations, as compared with 80% in the 3rd and 4th generations; the corresponding preoviposition periods averaged 25 and 6-8 days.


Accession: 001053051



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