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Changes of a wild ecotype of the olive fruit fly during adaptation to lab rearing


, : Changes of a wild ecotype of the olive fruit fly during adaptation to lab rearing. Fruit flies of economic importance Proceedings of the CEC/IOBC International Symposium, Athens, Greece, 16-19 November 1982: 416-422

A laboratory colony of Dacus oleae (Gmel.) initiated from adults that emerged from olives collected in the field in Greece took about 3-4 generations to adapt to laboratory rearing. Less than 50% of females oviposited in the 1st 2 generations, as compared with 80% in the 3rd and 4th generations; the corresponding preoviposition periods averaged 25 and 6-8 days.

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Related references

Tsitsipis J.A., 1983: Changes of a wild ecotype of the olive fruit fly dacus oleae during adaptation to laboratory rearing. Cavalloro, R. Fruit Flies Of Economic Importance; Proceedings Of The Cec Iobc International Symposium, Athens, Greece, Nov. 16-19, . Xii 642p. A. A. A. Balkema: Rotterdam, Netherlands (dist. By Mbs: Salem, N.h., Usa). Illus. P416-422

Zervas, Ga, 1984: Physiological changes of wild olive fruit flies reared in artificial diet and in olive fruit. International Congress of Entomology Proceedings 17: 411

Tsitsipis, J.A., 1978: The mass rearing of the olive fruit fly and its importance in controlling it. Improvement of larval rearing. The development in Greece of an adequate method of mass-rearing the olive pest Dacus oleae (Gmel.) in the laboratory [see RAE/A 66, 1848, 3781] is reviewed, with particular reference to recent improvements in the diet as regards substitution of ch...

Anonymous, 1966: The biocomplex of the olive fruit fly , the olive fruit midge , and the fungus Macrophoma dalmatica Berl and Vogl in olive fruits in the Mediterranean Basin

Tsitsipis, Ja, 1982: The mass rearing of the olive fruit fly.. Geoponika 27(283): 34-41

Kaspi, R.; Feitelson, I.; Drezner, T.; Yuval, B., 2001: A novel method for rearing the progeny of wild Mediterranean fruit flies using artificial fruit. A technique for rearing the progeny of wild Ceratitis capitata flies was developed. The method is based on wild captured flies which are allowed to oviposit in artificial fruit containing larval rearing medium. Flies develop in the fruit from eggs...

Harpaz, I.; Gerson, U., 1966: The biocomplex of the olive fruit fly (Dacus oleae Gmel.), the olive fruit midge (Prolasioptera berlesiana Paoli), and the fungus Macrophoma dalmatica Berl. & Vogl. in olive fruits in the Mediterranean basin. The papers published in this volume include the following of entomological interest: - In recent years an increase has been noted in the occurrence of the fungus Macrophoma dalmatica on olives in groves throughout Israel. A relation between this f...

Dimou,I.; Rempoulakis,P.; Economopoulos,A.P., 2010: Olive fruit fly adult rearing diet without antibiotic. The olive fruit fly [<i>Bactrocera</i> (<i>Dacus</i>) <i>oleae</i> (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)] adult diet since its development in the 1960's regularly incorporates antibiotic. Considering recent findin...

Tzanakakis, M.E.; Economopoulos, A.P., 1967: Two efficient larval diets for continuous rearing of the olive fruit fly. Two oligidic diets for the olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae (Gmelin), and their method of preparation are described. They both have the same qualitative composition in main nutrients and preservatives. Proper texture is achieved by agar in one, and ce...

Tsitsipis, J.A., 1975: Mass rearing of the olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae (Gmelin), at 'Democritos'. The production of more than 4.5 million pupae of Dacus oleae (Gmel.) in the laboratory in Greece within a 4-month period during the summer and autumn of 1973 at a much reduced cost was made possible by improvements in the rearing system. The repla...