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Chemical aspects of a colour defect in white mould cheese


, : Chemical aspects of a colour defect in white mould cheese. 23 Arbeitstagung des Arbeitsgebietes Lebensmittelhygiene Lebensmittelqualitat und Verbraucherschutz: 307-310

A brown colour in white mould cheese was caused by micrococci and coryneform bacteria. The coloured substance had a mol. wt. of <2300 on acrylamide/agarose gel chromatography, and was identified by UV spectrometry as a peptide containing no tryptophan and with a lower proportion of tyrosine relative to phenylalanine than in the cheese.

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Related references

Luf, W., 1982: Chemical aspects of a color defect in white mold cheese. Lebensmittelqualitat und Verbraucherschutz: 23 Tagung des Arbeitsgebietes Lebensmittelhygiene herausgegeben von der Deutschen Veterinarmedizinischen Gesellschaft: 310

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