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Chemical causes of flavour deterioration in pasteurized milk


, : Chemical causes of flavour deterioration in pasteurized milk. Journal of the Society of Dairy Technology 36(1): 21-26

Milk was heat-treated in a Franklin laboratory pasteurizer to give time/temp. conditions similar to those of HTST pasteurization then stored in full glass bottles at 7 deg C in the dark for up to 14 days. Initial mean concn. of dissolved O2 was 8.38 mg/l. The O2 consumption over the 1st 6 days storage was 4.1 mg/l; 7.1% was lost through the rubber septum, 34% through ascorbic acid oxidation, 36.1% through bacterial growth and 3.4% through sulphydryl oxidation.

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Related references

Mikawa, K.; Arima, S., 1979: Studies on the effects of psychrotrophic bacteria on milk quality. V. Relationship between quality tests and flavour deterioration of market milk, laboratory pasteurized milk and Pseudomonas fluorescens inoculated milk. Samples of commercially pasteurized milk (market milk), laboratory pasteurized milk (75 deg C for 15 min) and market milk inoculated with Pseudomonas fluorescens were stored at 6 deg C for up to 29 days. Before and during storage samples were test...

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