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Sixty years of stand development in a southern Appalachian cove-hardwood stand



Sixty years of stand development in a southern Appalachian cove-hardwood stand



Forest Ecology and Management 5(3): 229-241



The development of a stand dominated by yellow poplar is described beginning with its inception after clearfelling in 1913, followed by a severe fire in 1916, and a cleaning in 1923. No subsequent treatments were imposed; natural mortality was the only factor affecting stand development since 1923. Stand density, b.a. and average stem diam. by individual species are shown for six stand ages. Diam. distribution of the 247 largest trees per ha is also shown for six stand ages.

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Accession: 001124433

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1016/0378-1127(83)90074-9



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