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Calendula as a warm season cut flower or landscape plant



Calendula as a warm season cut flower or landscape plant



Flower and Nursery Reportand 1984; (Fall and Spring): 5-6



Calendula officinalis is usually described as a cool season annual in most of California, but some heat resistant cultivars are now available. In a trial 21 cultivars were planted out in the field on May 24. Plants were not pinched out or deshooted but were irrigated. All cultivars reached peak flowering 2 months after planting out.

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Accession: 001311712

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