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Effect of different dietary levels of calcium and phosphorus on phytate hydrolysis by chicks



Effect of different dietary levels of calcium and phosphorus on phytate hydrolysis by chicks



Nutrition Reports International 32(4): 909-914



Experiments were conducted to study the effect of different dietary levels of calcium and phosphorus on the ability of chicks to hydrolyze phytate. Broiler chicks, 3 weeks old, were fed diets composed primarily of corn and soybean meal containing varying amounts of calcium and phosphorus. Quantitative feed consumption and excreta records were maintained. Feed and excreta were assayed for phytate phosphorus and the amount hydrolyzed was the difference between intake and excretion. Experiment 1 was a 2 .times. 2 factoral design utilizing .09 or 1.0% calcium and .12 or .45% non-phytate phosphorus. Increasing the calcium content of the diet to 1.0% reduced (P < .05) phytate hydrolysis regardless of phosphorus content. Increasing the non-phytate phosphorus content to .45% improved (P < .05) phytate hydrolysis in the absence of added calcium. In Experiment 2, where all diets contained 1.0% calcium, the addition of inorganic phosphorus from dibasic calcium orthophosphate decreased (P < .05) phytate hydrolysis by chicks.

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