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Assessment of spatial distribution of growth in the elongation zone of grass leaf blades



Assessment of spatial distribution of growth in the elongation zone of grass leaf blades



Plant Physiology 85(1): 290-293



Knowledge about the spatial distribution of growth is essential for understanding the leaf growth process. In grasses the elongation zone is located at the base of the leaf blade and is enclosed by sheaths of older leaves. Assessment of spatial growth distribution, therefore, necessitates use of a destructive method. We used a fine needle to make holes through bases of tillers at the location of the leaf elongation zone of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), then measured the displacement of the holes after a 6 or 24 h interval. Needle holes caused a 22 to 41% decrease in daily leaf elongation so experiments were conducted to investigate if the spatial distribution of growth in the elongation zone was altered. Leaf elongation rate was reduced similarly when needle holes were made within or above the zone where cell elongation occurs. Distribution of elongation within the zone was the same when estimated by displacement of needle holes or ink marks placed on the epidermis of the elongation zone after surrounding tissue had been removed. Making holes at different locations within the elongation zone did not differentially affect the relative contribution of the damaged or undamaged parts to leaf elongation. These findings demonstrate that needle holes or ink marks in paired leaves can be used to estimate the relative distribution of growth in the elongation zone of undamaged tall fescue leaf blades.

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Accession: 001533166

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16665672

DOI: 10.1104/pp.85.1.290



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