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Chemistry, mineralogy and origin of the clay-hill nitrate deposits, Amargosa River Valley, Death Valley region, California, U.S.A



Chemistry, mineralogy and origin of the clay-hill nitrate deposits, Amargosa River Valley, Death Valley region, California, U.S.A



Chemical Geology 67(1/2): 85-102



The clay-hill nitrate deposits of the Armagosa River Valley, California, are caliche-type accumulation of water-soluble saline minerals in clay-rich soils on saline lake beds of Miocene, Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene age. The soils have a maximum thickness of ~ 50 cm, and commonly consist of three layers: (1) an upper 5-10 cm of saline-free soil; (2) an underlying 15-20 cm of rubbly saline soil; and (3) a hard nitrate-rich caliche, 10-20 cm thick, at the bottom of the soil profile.

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Accession: 001546148

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DOI: 10.1016/0009-2541(88)90008-3


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