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Dust production by wind erosion: necessary conditions and estimates of vertical fluxes of dust and visibility reduction by dust



Dust production by wind erosion: necessary conditions and estimates of vertical fluxes of dust and visibility reduction by dust



Physics of desertification: 361-370



Differing meteorological conditions that supply sufficient momentum to the surface to sustain wind erosion are organized with respect to the ratio of boundary layer height to Monin-Obukof length, L. Conditions for large-scale dust storms include strong surface heating and a strong upper level momentum source. Visibility is related to mass concentration by an equation MV = C, where visibility, C, is a constant and M is the mass concentration of dust in the air.

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Accession: 001567775

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