+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Effects of alternate and simultaneous administrations of calcium and phosphorus on calcium metabolism in children receiving total parenteral nutrition



Effects of alternate and simultaneous administrations of calcium and phosphorus on calcium metabolism in children receiving total parenteral nutrition



Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 10(5): 513-516



The effects of alternate and simultaneous administrations of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) on Ca metabolism in children receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) were examined. Eight children, aged 2 to 36 months, were studied. The following three solutions were administered: solution 1 contains Ca (533 mg/liter); solution 2 contains P (413 mg/liter) and solution 3 contains Ca (267 mg/liter) and P (207 mg/liter). Solutions 1 and 2 were administered alternately for 24-hr periods. (Results) I. During administration of solution 1, significant hypophosphatemia (4.39 .+-. 0.26 mg/dl) and hypercalcemia (9.96 .+-. 0.15 mg/dl) were observed and, conversely, during administration of solution 2, significant hypocalcemia (8.36 .+-. 0.18 mg/dl) and hyperphosphatemia (6.16 .+-. 0.27 mg/dl) were observed. During administration of solution 3, the serum levels of both minerals were maintained within the normal ranges (Ca 9.46 .+-. 0.12 mg/dl, P 5.65 .+-. 0.21 mgdl). II. The urinary excretion of cyclic AMP was significantly lower during administration of solution 1 (6.67 .+-. 0.45 nmol/mg creatinine (Cr)) as compared with solution 3 (7.50 .+-. 0.61 nmol/mg of Cr). On the other hand, the excretion was significantly higher during administration of solution 2 (11.55 .+-. 1.58 nmol/mg of Cr) as compared with solution 3, indicating the existence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. III. The Ca and P retention rate were significantly higher with solution 3 (Ca 79.0 .+-. 5.5%, P 73.2 .+-. 7.2% of the intake) than with solutions 1 and 2 alternately (Ca 62.7 .+-. 4.5%, P 49.2 .+-. 9.3%). (Conclusions) Simultaneous administrations of Ca and P are preferable to their alternate administrations for Ca metabolism in children receiving TPN.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 001579754

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 3020267

DOI: 10.1177/0148607186010005513


Related references

Calcium metabolism in children during long-term total parenteral nutrition: the influence of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D intakes. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 13(4): 367-375, 1991

Guidelines for the use of vitamins, trace elements, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in infants and children receiving total parenteral nutrition: report of the Subcommittee on Pediatric Parenteral Nutrient Requirements from the Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 48(5): 1324-1342, 1988

Effect of phosphorus on urinary calcium excretion in rats receiving total parenteral nutrition. Federation Proceedings 43(4): ABSTRACT 4124, 1984

Calcium and phosphorus metabolism during total parenteral nutrition. Annals of Surgery 197(1): 1-6, 1983

Simultaneous infusion of calcium and phosphorus in parenteral nutrition for premature infants: use of physiologic calcium/phosphorus ratio. Journal of pediatrics 114(1): 115-119, 1989

Increased urinary losses of calcium phosphorus and magnesium in patients receiving cyclic vs. continuous total parenteral nutrition. Clinical Research 31(2): 246A, 1983

Effects of vitamin d vit d withdrawal on calcium and vit d metabolism during long term home total parenteral nutrition tpn in children. Clinical Nutrition 6: 17, 1987

Increased calcium supplementation in neonates receiving total parenteral nutrition results in improved calcium retention. Clinical Research: 144a, 1985

Reduction of total parenteral nutrition-induced urinary calcium loss by increasing the phosphorus in the total parenteral nutrition prescription. Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 10(2): 188-190, 1986

Calcium glycerophosphate as a source of calcium and phosphorus in total parenteral nutrition solutions. Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 15(2): 176-180, 1991

Calcium Metabolism in Children During Long-Term Total Parenteral Nutrition. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 13(4): 367-375, 1991

Does Adding Intravenous Phosphorus to Parenteral Nutrition Has Any Effects on Calcium and Phosphorus Metabolism and Bone Mineral Content in Preterm Neonates?. Acta Medica Iranica 55(6): 395-398, 2017

Calcium, Phosphorus, and Protein Metabolism in Leprosy: A Study of the Total Calcium, Diffusible and Nondiffusible Calcium, Phosphorus, Total Proteins, Albumin, and Globulin in the Blood Serum. Public Health Reports (1896-1970) 47(7): 380, 1932

Calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D requirements of infants receiving parenteral nutrition. Journal of Perinatology 8(3): 263-268, 1988

Superior retentions of calcium and phosphorus obtained by using calcium glycero phosphate in place of calcium gluconate potassium bi phosphate and potassium bi phosphate total parenteral nutrition solutions. Federation Proceedings 43(4): ABSTRACT 4229, 1984