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Effects of dietary energy level and supplemental protein source on performance of growing steers and nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance in lambs



Effects of dietary energy level and supplemental protein source on performance of growing steers and nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance in lambs



Journal of Animal Science 65(3): 658-668



Four experiments were conducted to evaluate three crude protein (CP) sources (urea, U; soybean meal, SBM; corn gluten meal, CGM) in diets based on corn silage (high energy) or grass hay (low energy). In Exp. 1 and 2, growing steers were fed all combinations of energy and protein source at 10.5 or 12% CP. Steers fed high energy diets or 12% CP had improved (P less than .05) daily gains and feed:gain over 84 d. Protein source had no effect (P greater than .05) on performance except that steers fed U consumed more (P less than .05) feed than those fed CGM. Steers were fed experimental diets to a common weight and switched to an 85% concentrate diet for finishing. During finishing, steers fed low energy diets in the growing period consumed more (P less than .05) feed and had increased (P less than .05) feed:gain compared with those fed high energy diets. Growing lambs were fed the same diets as steers. At 10.5% CP, lambs fed high energy diets had higher (P less than .05) digestibilities of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), nitrogen (N) and fiber components, and retained more (P less than .05) N. For lambs on 12% CP, high energy diets had higher (P less than .05) DM and OM digestibilities and lower (P less than .05) N digestibilities. At 12% CP, energy level had no effect (P greater than .05) on N retained. Protein source had no effect (P greater than .05) on N retention. There appeared to be no advantage in supplementing with ruminally undegradable proteins, i.e. CGM, in these experiments.

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Accession: 001580386

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PMID: 3667430



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