+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Nectar production of Epilobium angustifolium L. at different air humidities; nectar sugar in individual flowers and the optimal foraging theory



Nectar production of Epilobium angustifolium L. at different air humidities; nectar sugar in individual flowers and the optimal foraging theory



Oecologia 59(1): 40-48



The nectar production of E. angustifolium L. was investigated at 20.degree. C and 50, 78 and 94% ambient humidity in the climatic test chamber. By means of permanent pipettes, freshly produced nectar was sucked off immediately after secretion, and nectar samples were also taken at 10-h and 48-h intervals to investigate the post-secretory influence of ambient humidity. Volume and sugar concentration of samples from individual flowers were measured and the sugar contained was calculated. The rate of sugar production remains constant for all ambient humidities and extraction intervals investigated; the mean value for all 180 samples is 1.55 mg sucrose equivalents/24 h. Sugar concentration of secretion nectar is linearly dependent on ambient humidity over the range investigated, and nectar volume and sugar concentration change according to the theoretically expected curve for solutions with a sugar content of 1.55 mg sucrose. The response of secretion nectar to steplike changes in ambient humidity was investigated and the transient function described. The nectaries respond immediately to changes in ambient humidity. The consequences of the results for nectar production and nectar reward of individual flowers in the field and for the optimal foraging of pollinators are discussed. Discussion concentrates particularly on the following questions: what influence the variability of nectar reward in individual flowers may have on flower-visiting bumblebees; whether these animals have the sensory capabilities to measure sugar exactly and whether the water relations of pollinators may also influence foraging behavior.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 001641210

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 25024144

DOI: 10.1007/bf00388069


Related references

Nectar Production of Epilobium angustifolium L. at Different Air Humidities; Nectar Sugar in Individual Flowers and the Optimal Foraging Theory. Oecologia 59(1): 40-48, 1983

Nectar accumulation in flowers of fireweed epilobium angustifolium onagraceae in response to simulated defoliation. Journal of Apicultural Research 28(4): 181-186, 1989

Calculating Nectar Production Rates: Residual Nectar and Optimal Foraging. Oecologia 58(2): 258-259, 1983

Calculating nectar production rates: residual nectar and optimal foraging. Oecologia 58(2): 258-259, 1983

Calculating nectar production rates: residual nectar and optimal foraging. Oecologia (Berlin): 582: 258-259, 1983

Calculating nectar production rates: residual nectar and optimal foraging Aconitum columbianum, bumblebees, ecophysiology. Oecologia 8(2): 258-259, 1983

Elevated carbon dioxide increases nectar production in Epilobium angustifolium L. Oecologia 146(2): 311-317, 2005

Finding flowers in the dark: nectar-feeding bats integrate olfaction and echolocation while foraging for nectar. Royal Society Open Science 3(8): 160199, 2016

Optimal Foraging in Bumblebees: Why Is Nectar Left behind in Flowers?. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 9(1): 41-44, 1981

Optimal foraging in bumblebees why is nectar left behind in flowers?. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 9.1: 41-44, 1981

Accumulation of nectar in the flowers of buckwheat Honey crop, nectar secretion, sugar content, USSR.1. Pchelovodstvo (6) 12-13, 1983

Observations on nectar secretion in fireweed epilobium angustifolium l. onagraceae. Journal of Apicultural Research 29(3): 132-137, 1990

Nectar secretion in excised flowers. V. Effects of indoleacetic acid and sugar supply on distribution of sucrose in flower tissues and nectar. Canadian Journal of Botany 56(6): 565-571, 1978

Nectar secretion in excised flowers part 5 effects of iaa and sugar supply on distribution of carbon 14 sucrose in flower tissues and nectar. Canadian Journal of Botany 56(6): 555-571, 1978

Nectar foraging by stingless bees in Costa Rica: botanical and climatological influences on sugar concentration of nectar collected by Melipona. Apidologie. January-February; 301: 43-55, 1999