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Root growth potential, seedling morphology and bud dormancy correlate with survival of loblolly pine seedlings planted in December in Alabama



Root growth potential, seedling morphology and bud dormancy correlate with survival of loblolly pine seedlings planted in December in Alabama



Tree Physiology 1(3): 253-263



First-year survival of December-planted loblolly pine seedlings sampled from 20 nurseries ranged from 36 to 86%. Various characteristics of the seedlings including root growth potential (RGP), shoot/root ratio, root weight, and stem length were correlated with survival. A regression model using the number of new roots .gtoreq. 0.5 cm and the shoot/root ratio accounted for 80% of the variation in first-year survival. Alone, the number of new roots .gtoreq. 0.5 cm accounted for 76% of the variation in survival. Foliar nutrients were not correlated with survival. Seedlings with a high proportion of quiescent buds at planting had a higher RGP and better survival than seedlings with dormant (endodormant) buds. The data suggest that seedlings with dormant buds should not be planted on sites where rapid new root growth is needed for survival.

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Accession: 001677772

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 14975880

DOI: 10.1093/treephys/1.3.253


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