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Weed potential of Mikania micrantha H.B.K., and its control in fallows after shifting agriculture (jhum) in north-east India



Weed potential of Mikania micrantha H.B.K., and its control in fallows after shifting agriculture (jhum) in north-east India



Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 18(3): 195-204



M. micrantha is an exotic perennial weed which colonizes communities developing after slash-and-burn agriculture (jhum) at lower alt. in NE India. Reproduction through ramets arising from rosettes exceeded that from seeds. The ramet population growth was highest during the monsoon season as a consequence of high population birth and large-scale mortality. Net population increased with increasing age of the fallow for 3 years, and declined drastically in 6- and 12-year-old fallows.

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