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Effects of scheduled feeding on feeding behavior and on brain serotonin metabolism in rats



Effects of scheduled feeding on feeding behavior and on brain serotonin metabolism in rats



Journal of the Osaka City Medical Center 38(2): 283-300



Most patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia show repeated refusal to eat or to restrict food intake and/or binge eating. To elucidate the effect of eating behavior on brain serotonin metabolism, Wistar rats were subjected to scheduled feeding, i.e, feeding for 2, 4, 6 and 12 hours per day for 9 successive days and feeding and fasting for 24 hours each altenatively for 11 successive days. Concentrations of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in 6 different brain regions were determined, during these regimens. The results are as follows: 1) In the 2-hours-feeding group, food and water intake by the control groups was 43% and 69%, respectively, on the first day, then tissue these values increased to 52% and 77%, respectively, on the 8th day. On the 9th day, these rats weighed 107% less than on the first day and 72% of that of the controls. Both 5-HT and 5-HIAA increased significantly in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb. Also, 5-HT increased significantly in the striatum. 2) In the 6-hours-feeding group, food and water intake by the control was 33% and 53% respectively, on the first day, then these values increased to 62% and 54%, respectively, of the control on the 8th day. On the 9th day, these rats weighed 93% less than on the first day and 60% of that of the controls. Both 5-HT and 5-HIAA increased significantly in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. 3) In the 12-hours-feeding group, there were no significant differences in food and water intake, body weight on the 8th day, and 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the 6 different regions of the brain, as compared to findings in the control. 4) Food and water intake in the 24-hours-feeding group were increased significantly with each feeding day, as compared to findings in the control. Body weight of these rats on the 11th day was 67% of that of the control. Both 5-HT and 5-HIAA increased significantly in the hypothalamus and 5-HIAA increased significantly in the cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb. These results suggest that successive scheduled feeding, especially 2- and 6-hours-feeding lead to a significantly increased food and water intakes within feeding time, as against the declinate in the body weight gain. Also, the metabolite rate of 5-HT in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and striatum increases.

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Accession: 001819807

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