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Excessive seedling height, high shoot-to-root ratio, and benomyl root dip reduce survival of stored loblolly pine seedlings



Excessive seedling height, high shoot-to-root ratio, and benomyl root dip reduce survival of stored loblolly pine seedlings



Tree Planters' Notes 38(4): 19-22



Seeds of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) were sown on 20 Feb., 3 April or 15 May 1985 in boxes filled with coarse sand. On 3-4 Dec. 1985, seedlings were lifted and dipped in a clay slurry with or without benomyl before storage at 2 degrees C for 12 wk. The seedlings were planted in deep coarse sand on 25 Feb. 1986. April and May were exceptionally dry.

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Accession: 001831068

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