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Experimental models for the investigation of water and solute transport in man. Implications for oral rehydration solutions



Experimental models for the investigation of water and solute transport in man. Implications for oral rehydration solutions



Drugs 36 Suppl 4: 65-79



For patients with mild to moderate dehydration, oral rehydration therapy has proved a simple and efficacious treatment. There remains, however, a need to develop improved oral rehydration solutions (ORS), and suitable experimental models are required to develop and assess new formulations. The ideal model for such investigations would take into account rates of gastric emptying, influx and efflux of water and solutes in the intestine, and the consequent changes in body composition.

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Accession: 001831874

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PMID: 3069447



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