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Hereditary cerebellar abiotrophy in Australian Kelpie dogs



Hereditary cerebellar abiotrophy in Australian Kelpie dogs



Australian Veterinary Journal 66(9): 301-302



A prospective breeding trial was carried out by mating an Australian Kelpie bitch with clinical cerebellar disease with her full brother, a clinically normal dog from the same litter. In the resulting litter of 8 pups, 2 males and 2 females were severely affected clinically. A fifth pup, a male, was thought to be clumsy by the owner. Three pups showed clinical disease from 5 to 6 weeks of age, another from 11 to 12 weeks of age. The pups were very bright and alert and showed varying degrees of change including significant ataxia, hypermetria, head tremor and truncal ataxia. There was decreased proprioception in all legs, particularly the hind legs. Tactile placing was depressed. One pup had grand mal seizures. Examination of 3 more puppies at 5.5 months of age showed decreased proprioception in hind limbs in all dogs with hypermetria in one dog. PM examination of 6 pups showed lesions confined to the brain. Histologically changes varied in intensity within each dog and were confined to the cerebellum with the vermis the most commonly and severely affected site. There was regional loss of Purkinje cells and occasional necrotic cells were seen in some dogs. There was mild spongiosis and wallerian degeneration in white matter of affected folia. One pup had moderate hydrocephalus but no change in the cerebellum. The pattern of inheritance was not fully identified but a single recessive autosomal gene may be involved.

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Accession: 001850967

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 2818374

DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-0813.1989.tb13959.x


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