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Influence of tree canopies on the quantity of water and amount of chemical elements reaching the peat surface of a basin mire in the Midlands of England



Influence of tree canopies on the quantity of water and amount of chemical elements reaching the peat surface of a basin mire in the Midlands of England



Journal of Ecology Oxford 77(2): 357-370



(1) The influence of three different tree canopies on the quantity and chemical composition of rainfall was studied at a small forested basin mire for two years. (2) Percentage throughfall of incident precipitation under pine, fen and mixed broadleaved woodlands was 68%, 79%, and 80%, respectively. Marked variation was also observed over time. (3) Substantial quantities of plant nutrient elements reach the mire surface in rainfall which is supplemented in passing through the tree layer. The order of increase in total chemical complement of throughfall is: pine woodland > fen woodland > mixed woodland. (4) Comparison is made with rainfall and throughfall data collected at other forest sites in Britain and elsewhere. The ways in which vegetation canopies may change the chemical content of rainfall are discussed and the external sources of nutrient enrichment to rainfall are considered. (5) Of the ions studied, those which show greatest increase in passing through the tree canopies are sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, ammonium, sulphate and chloride. The highest input occurs during the winter months when rainfall is maximal.

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Accession: 001864358

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DOI: 10.2307/2260755



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