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Symbiosis between social spiders and yeast: the role in prey attraction


, : Symbiosis between social spiders and yeast: the role in prey attraction. Psyche 94(1-2): 151-158

Evidence is provided that the social spider Mallos gregalis from Mexico uses a scented bait to attract prey. These odours are produced by yeasts growing on the discarded carcasses of muscoid flies which have been incorporated into the communal nest.


Accession: 001962105

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Related references

Tietjen, WJ.; Ayyagari, LR., 1984: Symbionts associated with the web of the social spider Mallos gregalis (Araneae: Dictynidae): the role in prey attraction. American Arachnology, 14 No. 30

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