EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of antimalarial agents?


Journal of ethno pharmacology 32(1-3): 155-165
Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of antimalarial agents?
The resistance of Plasmodium falciparum, the cause of tertian malaria, to synthetic antimalarials, together with the resistance of the vector mosquitoes to insecticides, has resulted in a resurgence in the use of quinine and a search for new antimalarial agents. In recent years, artemisinin, isolated from Artemisia annua which is used in Chinese traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria, has proved to be effective in the treatment of cerebral malaria due to chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum. The development of in vitro tests utilising P. falciparum obtained from malaria patients means that it is possible to use bioassay guided fractionation of active extracts in order to isolate active principles. A number of laboratories throughout the world are currently investigating plants used in traditional medicine for their active constituents. Some of their results will be described and in particular two aspects of our investigations with species of Simaroubaceae and Menispermaceae will be discussed. There is every possibility that such approaches which use leads from Ethnopharmacology will result in the development of new antimalarial agents. It is vitally important to those populations relying on traditional medicines for the treatment of malaria that the safety and efficacy of such medicines be established, their active principles determined and that reproducible dosage forms be prepared and made available for use.

Accession: 002042316

PMID: 1881153

DOI: 10.1016/0378-8741(91)90113-R

Download PDF Full Text: Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of antimalarial agents?



Related references

Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of antiviral drugs?. Journal of ethno pharmacology 32(1-3): 141-153, 1991

Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of new anticancer drugs?. Journal of ethno pharmacology 32(1-3): 117-133, 1991

Can ethnopharmacology contribute to the development of anti-fertility drugs?. Journal of ethno pharmacology 32(1-3): 167-177, 1991

Ethnopharmacology and the development of natural PAF antagonists as therapeutic agents. Journal of ethno pharmacology 32(1-3): 135-139, 1991

Ethnopharmacology and the development of natural PAF antagonists as therapeutic agents. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 32(1-3): 135-139, 1991

New Potential Antimalarial Agents: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Some Novel Quinoline Derivatives as Antimalarial Agents. Molecules 21(7): -, 2016

Drug resistance in Plasmodium and the development of antimalarial agents. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi: 504-507, 1974

Development of novel antimalarial agents targeting heme polymerization. Abstracts of Papers American Chemical Society 218(1-2): MEDI 291, 1999

QSAR modeling for the antimalarial activity of 1,4-naphthoquinonyl derivatives as potential antimalarial agents. Current Computer-Aided Drug Design 9(1): 95-107, 2014

Antimalarial agents from plants II. Decursivine, a new antimalarial indole alkaloid from Rhaphidophora decursiva. Pharmaceutical Biology 40(3): 221-224, 2002