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Can predators regulate small mammal populations? Evidence from house mouse outbreaks in Australia


Oikos 59.3: 382-392
Can predators regulate small mammal populations? Evidence from house mouse outbreaks in Australia

Accession: 002042351

DOI: 10.2307/3545150

Download PDF Full Text: Can predators regulate small mammal populations? Evidence from house mouse outbreaks in Australia



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