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Dietary roughage regimen for feedlot steers: reduced roughage level (2%) during the mid-finishing period



Dietary roughage regimen for feedlot steers: reduced roughage level (2%) during the mid-finishing period



Journal of Animal Science 69(9): 3461-3466



Because roughage in feedlot diets is one of the most expensive ingredients on an energy basis, regimens that minimize roughage usage are of interest. Crossbred steers of British breeds (n = 112, initial BW = 405 kg) were used to compare the feeding of diets containing 2% roughage from d 22 through 84 and 10% roughage from d 85 to finish (d 133; 2/10%) to the feeding of 10% roughage throughout the finishing period (10/10%); all diets were based on steam-flaked sorghum grain and contained monensin and tylosin. When the 2% roughage diet was fed, steers consumed less feed (6.8 vs 7.8 kg/d, P < .01), tended to gain less (1.11 vs 1.20 kg/d, P = .13), and were numerically more efficient (16.5 vs 15.5 kg of gain/100 kg of DMI, P > .2) than steers fed the 10% roughage diet (10/10%). After the roughage content was increased from 2 to 10% on d 85 (all steers fed 10% roughage), steers fed the 2/10% regimen had greater DMI (8.4 vs 8.0 kg/d, P =.08) and ADG (1.29 vs 1.09 kg, P =.06), and tended to be more efficient (15.4 vs 13.6 kg of gain/100 kg of DMI, P = .10) than steers fed the 10/10% regimen. Steers fed the two regimens had similar (P > .2) overall gain performance. The 2/10% regimen tended to have a greater percentage of Choice carcasses (58 vs 42%, P = .14) and numerically more liver abscesses (24 vs 15%, P > .2) than the 10/10% regimen. The 2/10% regimen reduced roughage usage 34 kg/steer and reduced feed costs about $4/steer. Results indicate that cost of gain can be reduced by feeding roughage levels below typical levels (e.g., 2%) for at least 60 d during the middle of the feeding period.

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Accession: 002072096

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PMID: 1657850



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