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Dietary selenate versus selenite for cattle, sheep, and horses



Dietary selenate versus selenite for cattle, sheep, and horses



Journal of Animal Science 70(6): 1965-1970



Food and Drug Administration regulations currently permit addition of .3 mg of Se per kilogram of diet for chickens, turkeys, ducks, swine, sheep, and cattle. However, field reports indicate that this level may not be adequate for ruminants in all situations. Because sodium selenite is the most common supplemental form and is known to be readily absorbed to particles or reduced to insoluble elemental Se or selenides in acid, anaerobic environments, studies were conducted with dairy cattle, sheep, and horses fed sodium selenate to determine whether Se from this source was more bioavailable than Se from sodium selenite. A 2-wk period of no Se supplementation was followed by 49 or 56 d of Se supplementation at .3 mg/kg of dietary DM. Serum Se concentrations and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activities measured initially and periodically thereafter revealed no difference between Se forms in sheep and horses and only a small (P less than .05) advantage for selenate in supporting serum Se concentration in dairy cattle. Selenium concentrations in skeletal muscle and liver of sheep were not different between Se forms. Serum Se, but not GSHPx, increased with time, and .3 mg of supplemental Se per kilogram of dietary DM from either sodium selenate or sodium selenite supported normal serum Se concentrations in sheep, dairy cattle, and horses.

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Accession: 002072103

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PMID: 1321804


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