Fatty acids of ozone-exposed Scots pine and poplar trees and of damaged field-grown Norway spruce trees

Kyburz, S.; Eichenberger, W.; Keller, T.; Rennenberg, H.; Schroder, P.

European Journal of Forest Pathology 21(1): 49-56

1990


DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0329.1991.tb00301.x
Accession: 002108231

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Abstract
The fatty acid composition was analysed in foliage of 4-year-old Pinus sylvestris and 1-year-old Populus euramericana [P. canadensis] clones treated continuously with 100-200 micro g/msuperscript 3 O3 for 6 months, and needles of pollution damaged Picea abies trees. The fatty acid pattern of trees treated with O3 did not differ significantly from that of controls. However, in field-grown P. abies, a significant decrease of alpha -linolenic ( alpha 18:3) and an increase of linoleic (18:2) acid content paralleled increasing damage as judged by needle loss. No differences in the protein contents and pigment patterns were observed between healthy and damaged trees. It is concluded that in injured forest trees, the triene/diene fatty acid ratio may be depressed which in turn may cause a reduced frost resistance. The effect had to be ascribed to a combination of different stress factors rather than to O3 alone.

Fatty acids of ozone-exposed Scots pine and poplar trees and of damaged field-grown Norway spruce trees