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Ratio of Schistosoma haematobium to S. mattheei infections in Bulinus africanus snails from rural areas in the eastern Transvaal lowveld in South Africa



Ratio of Schistosoma haematobium to S. mattheei infections in Bulinus africanus snails from rural areas in the eastern Transvaal lowveld in South Africa



Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 84(4): 556



As part of a schistosomiasis control project in 1988-89, Bulinus africanus snails were collected in 2 rural areas bordering on the Kruger National Park, areas highly endemic for Schistosoma haematobium and S. mattheei. The water bodies from which the snails were collected were used extensively by the local people and their Nguni cattle. Saccostomus campestris rodents were exposed individually to cercariae emerging from single snails, and developed worms were identified 90 days later by enzyme analysis.Of 353 B. africanus snails, 50 (14.2%) shed schistosome cercariae; 34 resulting rodent infections were characterized. Nineteen rodents yielded single sex infection and 15 yielded both males and females. Altogether there were 25 S. mattheei male and 20 S. mattheei female infections, and 2 S. haematobium male and 2 S. haematobium female infections, giving a S. mattheei/S. haematobium ratio of 45:4. The authors draw attention to the considerably higher snail infection rate with the "bovine" compared with human parasite (as also detected in Zimbabwe [see Trop. Dis. Bull., 1979, 76, abst. 979]), but the low prevalence of human infection with the former.Carolyn A. Brown Saccostomus campestris were exposed to schistosome cercariae shed by individual B. africanus collected in 2 rural areas bordering on the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The rodents were perfused 90 days later and the schistosomes were identified by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucomutase. Fifty (14.2%) of the 353 snails shed schistosome cercariae and 34 snails lived long enough to allow infection of S. campestris. Nineteen of the rodents had single sex infections and 15 produced male and female parasites, including 25 males and 20 females of Schistosoma mattheei and 2 males and 2 females of S. haematobium. Thus the ratio S. mattheei:S. haematobium was 11.25:1. Enzyme patterns revealed no polymorphism between the 2 species. The reason why considerably more B. africanus become infected with S. mattheei than with S. haematobium are discussed.

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Accession: 002202328

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PMID: 2091350

DOI: 10.1016/0035-9203(90)90038-g


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