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Response of seedling tea to height and frequency of mechanical harvesting in Kenya highlands



Response of seedling tea to height and frequency of mechanical harvesting in Kenya highlands



Tea 11(1): 8-12



Seedling tea was harvested mechanically every 42, 56 or 70 days at 2 heights (whereby the cutter bars were set at 1.0 or 2.0 cm above each previous harvesting level) and compared with hand plucking on flexible rounds over a period of 27 months. Machine harvesting almost doubled the yield and was at least 35 times faster than hand plucking. However, hand plucking resulted in better quality made tea, because the inclusion of coarse leaves was minimal.

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Accession: 002210320

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