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Soybean dry matter allocation under subambient and superambient levels of carbon dioxide


Agronomy Journal 83(5): 875-883
Soybean dry matter allocation under subambient and superambient levels of carbon dioxide
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] is expected to caused increases in crop growth and yield. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of subambient, as well as superambient, [CO2] on soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] dry matter production and allocation for two reasons: to assess response of plants to prehistoric as well as future expected CO2 levels and to increase confidence in [CO2] response curves by imposing a wide range of [CO2] treatments. Soybean was grown in outdoor, sunlit, controlled-environment chambers at CO2 levels of 160, 220, 280, 330, 660, and 990 .mu.mol (CO2) mol-1 (air). Total dry matter growth rates during the linear phase of vegetative growth were 5.0, 8.4, 10.9, 12.5, 18.2, and 20.7 g m-2 d-1 for the above respective [CO2]. Samples taken from 24 to 94 d after planting showed that the percentage of total plant mass in leaf trifoliolates decreased with increasing [CO2] whereas the percentage in structural components (petioles and stems) increased. At final harvest the respective [CO2] treatments resulted in 38, 53, 62, 100, 120, and 92% seed yield with respect to the 330 .mu.mol mol-1 treatment. Total dry weight responses were similar. Late season spider mite damage of the 990 and 280 .mu.mol mol-1 treatments reduced yields. These data confirm not only that rising CO2 should increase plant growth, but also that plant growth was probably seriously limited by atmospheric [CO2] in preindustrial revolution times back to the previous global glaciation.


Accession: 002226002



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