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Anatomical and metabolic responses to waterlogging and salinity in Spartina alterniflora and S. patens (Poaceae)



Anatomical and metabolic responses to waterlogging and salinity in Spartina alterniflora and S. patens (Poaceae)



American Journal of Botany 79(7): 765-770



The effects of waterlogging and salinity (25 or 325 mol m-3 NaCl) stressors on the anatomy and metabolism of the marsh grasses S. alterniflora Loisel. and S. patens Aiton (Muhl.) were investigated in a 2(3) factorial greenhouse experiment over 30 d. Waterlogging and salinity in combination resulted in anatomical and metabolic responses in both species. Waterlogging reduced soil redox potential and decreased root-specific gravity significantly in both species. The inadequacy of aerenchyma development under hypoxia to support aerobic root respiration in S. patens was indicated by significant increases in root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity of 1,752% and 420%, respectively, in the low and high salinity treatments. ADH activity was not increased significantly by flooding of S. alterniflora. Proline concentrations in roots and leaves were low at low salinities and increased significantly at high salinities in both species, but only under drained conditions. Decrease in leaf elongation by high salinity occurred in drained, but not flooded treatments in both species. Under flooded conditions, leaf elongation was significantly greater in S. alterniflora than S. patens. Greatest leaf elongation occurred in flooded low salinity S. alterniflora plants that had the least proline. Although both species are adapted to waterlogging and salinity, S. alterniflora appears to be more tolerant of reducing soil conditions and less responsive to higher salinity than S. patens.

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Accession: 002301229

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DOI: 10.2307/2444942



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