EurekaMag.com logo
+ Translate

Bateman's principle and plant reproduction: the role of pollen limitation in fruit and seed set


, : Bateman's principle and plant reproduction: the role of pollen limitation in fruit and seed set. Botanical Review 60(1): 83-139

Bateman's principle states that male fitness is usually limited by the number of matings achieved, while female fitness is usually limited by the resources available for reproduction. When applied to flowering plants this principle leads to the expectation that pollen limitation of fruit and seed set will be uncommon. However, if male searching for mates (including pollen dissemination via external agents) is not sufficiently successful, then the reproductive success of both sexes (or both sex functions in hermaphroditic plants) will be limited by number of matings rather than by resources, and Bateman' s principle cannot be expected to apply. Limitation of female success due to inadequate pollen receipt appears to be a common phenomenon in plants. Using published data on 258 species in which fecundity was reported for natural pollination and hand pollination with outcross pollen, I found significant pollen limitation at some times or in some sites in 159 of the 258 species (62%). When experiments were performed multiple times within a growing season, or in multiple sites or years, the statistical significance of pollen limitation commonly varied among times, sites or years, indicating that the pollination environment is not constant. There is some indication that, across species, supplemental pollen leads to increased fruit set more often than increased seed set within fruits, pointing to the importance of gamete packaging strategies in plant reproduction. Species that are highly self-incompatible obtain a greater benefit relative to natural pollination from artificial application of excess outcross pollen than do self-compatible species. This suggests that inadequate pollen receipt is a primary cause of low fecundity rates in perennial plants, which are often self-incompatible. Because flowering plants often allocate considerable resources to pollinator attraction, both export and receipt of pollen could be limited primarily by resource investment in floral advertisement and rewards. But whatever investment is made is attraction, pollinator behavioral stochasticity usually produces wide variation among flowers in reproductive success through both male and female functions. In such circumstances the optimal deployment of resources among megaspores, microspores, and pollinator attraction may often require more flowers or more ovules per flower than will usually be fertilized, in order to benefit from chance fluctuations that bring in large number of pollen grains. Maximizing seed set for the entire plant in a stochastic pollination environment might thus entail a packaging strategy for flower number or ovule number per flower that makes pollen limitation of fruit or seed set likely. Pollen availability may limit female success in individual flowers, entire plants (in a season or over a lifetime), or populations. The appropriate level must be distinguished depending on the nature of the question being addressed. Reprinted by permission of the publisher. .

Accession: 002308523

DOI: 10.2307/4354221

Download PDF Full Text: Bateman's principle and plant reproduction: the role of pollen limitation in fruit and seed set


Submit PDF Full Text

No spam - Every submission is manually reviewed

Due to poor quality, we do not accept files from Researchgate

Submitted PDF Full Texts will always be free for everyone
(We only charge for PDFs that we need to acquire)

Select a PDF file:
Close
Close

Related references

Burd, M., 1994: Batemanns principle and plant reproduction: the role of pollen limitation in fruit and seed set. Botanical review 60(1): 83-139

Simpson, Rachel A., 1997: Pollen limitation of seed production and seed limitation of recruitment in Lespedeza virginica, an old-field perennial plant. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America 78(4 SUPPL ): 312

Burkle, L.A.; Irwin, R.E.; Newman, D.A., 2007: Predicting the effects of nectar robbing on plant reproduction: implications of pollen limitation and plant mating system. The outcome of species interactions is often difficult to predict, depending on the organisms involved and the ecological context. Nectar robbers remove nectar from flowers, often without providing pollination service, and their effects on plant r...

Knight, T.M.; Steets, J.A.; Vamosi, J.C.; Mazer, S.J.; Burd, M.; Campbell, D.R.; Dudash, M.R.; Johnston, M.O.; Mitchell, R.J.; Ashman, T.L., 2005: Pollen limitation of plant reproduction: pattern and process. Quantifying the extent to which seed production is limited by the availability of pollen has been an area of intensive empirical study over the past few decades. Whereas theory predicts that pollen augmentation should not increase seed production,...

Ashman, T.-Lynn; Knight, T., M.; Steets, J., A.; Amarasekare, P.; Burd, M.; Campbell, D., R.; Dudash, M., R.; Johnston, M., O.; Mazer, S., J.; Mitchell, R., J.; Morgan, M., T.; Wilson, W., G., 2004: Pollen limitation of plant reproduction: Ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences. Determining whether seed production is pollen limited has been an area of intensive empirical study over the last two decades. Yet current evidence does not allow satisfactory assessment of the causes or consequences of pollen limitation. Here, we...

Jacquemyn, H.; Brys, R., 2016: Pollen limitation and the contribution of autonomous selfing to fruit and seed set in a rewarding orchid. • Although rewarding orchids are believed to have a high pollination efficiency, pollination success is often low, suggesting that rewarding orchids may be prone to pollen limitation. Assuming that selfing contributes significantly to fruit and...

Rosenheim, J.A.; Williams, N.M.; Schreiber, S.J.; Rapp, J.M., 2016: Modest Pollen Limitation of Lifetime Seed Production Is in Good Agreement with Modest Uncertainty in Whole-Plant Pollen Receipt. We recently introduced a model that predicts the degree to which a plant's lifetime seed production may be constrained by unpredictable shortfalls of pollen receipt ("pollen limitation"). Burd's comment in this issue criticized...

Fischer, Vhe, 1981: One pollen grain per stigma is, on principle, sufficient to cause fertilization as well as seed and fruit development in Beta vulgaris L. Biologisches Zentralblatt 100(5): 527-532

Fischer H.E., 1981: Pollen grain per stigma is on principle sufficient to cause fertilization as well as seed and fruit development in beta vulgaris. The relationship between the number of pollen grains arriving on the stigma and subsequent development of fruit and seed was studied in sugar beet. One pollen grain, arriving at the stigma and securing fertilization, is sufficient to induce fruit...

Fischer, H.E., 1981: 1 pollen grain per stigma is on principle sufficient to cause fertilization as well as seed and fruit development in beta vulgaris. The relationship between the number of pollen grains arriving on the stigma and subsequent development of fruit and seed was studied in sugar beet. One pollen grain, arriving at the stigma and securing fertilization, is sufficient to induce fruit...