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Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata F. 4. Parasites, predators and nest destroyers


, : Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata F. 4. Parasites, predators and nest destroyers. Indian Bee Journal 53(1-4): 30-33

In laboratory nests of X. fenestrata at Hisar, Haryana, India, 2 parasitic species were recorded, of which Monodontomerus obscurus was the more serious. The predators/nest destroyers were 4 ant species, one reptile (Hemidactylus sp., common wall lizard) one bird (Dicrurus adsimilis albirictus, king crow) 5 rat species and a squirrel. Ants were found on developing brood during summer and autumn, but the other predators were active throughout the year.

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Related references

Sihag, RC., 1992: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F 4 Parasites, predators and nest destroyers. Indian Bee Journal. 1991( ); 531-4: 30-33

Sihag, R.C., 1992: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F. 5. Nest recognition and response to nest displacement. The behaviour of female X. fenestrata was studied at a shelter containing artificial nests that were experimentally manipulated. The bees showed a high degree of nest site specificity, and during provisioning they seemed to recognize their own nes...

Sihag, R.C., 1993: Behaviour and ecology of subtropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F.: 7. Nest preferences and response to nest translocation. In field trials at Hisar, India, Xylocopa fenestrata preferred to nest in hollow stems of Arundo sp. rather than in stems of castor (Ricinis communis) and completely rejected hollow stems of bamboo. About 97% of the nesting bees occupied tunnels w...

Sihag, RC., 1993: Behaviour and ecology of the subtropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F. 7. Nest preferences and response to nest translocation. In field trials at Hisar, India, X. fenestrata preferred to nest in hollow stems of Arundo sp. rather than in stems of castor (Ricinis communis) and completely rejected hollow stems of bamboo. About 97% of the nesting bees occupied tunnels with an...

Sihag, RC., 1992: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F 2 Host plant association. Indian Bee Journal. 1990( ); 521-4: 38-40

Sihag, R.C., 1990: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F. 2. Host plant association. Weekly records were kept of plants visited by this bee in Haryana, India. A table lists 44 species (belonging to 16 families) that are major sources of nectar and/or pollen; for each species, its flowering period and its value to bees are given. T...

Sihag, RC., 1992: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F 1 Adaptive response to high temperatures. Indian Bee Journal. 1990( ); 521-4: 36-37

Sihag, R.C., 1990: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F. 1. Adaptive response to high temperatures. During the winter, bees foraged only when the ambient temperature exceeded 20 degrees C, and on these days only one foraging period was observed. In the summer, when the temperature was always above 20 degrees , the limiting factor for foraging wa...

Sihag, RC., 1992: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F 3 Provisioning and foraging activity patterns. Indian Bee Journal. 1991( ); 531-4: 23-29

Sihag, R.C., 1991: Behaviour and ecology of the sub-tropical carpenter bee, Xylocopa fenestrata F. 3. Provisioning and foraging activity patterns. The behaviour of X. fenestrata was observed at Hisar, Haryana, India. Bees provisioned nest cells from early or mid-March until the end of October. They collected pollen from 13 species of cultivated crops, and nectar from most of them, and were t...