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Estimating the nutrient intake of older adults: components of variation and the effect of varying the number of 24-hour dietary recalls






Journal of the American Dietetic Association 91(11): 1438-1439

Estimating the nutrient intake of older adults: components of variation and the effect of varying the number of 24-hour dietary recalls

There is a lack of data on dietary methodology in the elderly; most researchers rely on 3- to 7-day food records or repeated 24-hour dietary recalls when estimating dietary and nutrient intake of elderly persons. The major attraction of the 24-hour recall method is its logistical simplicity. It is generally agreed that for large groups of subjects, well-conducted 24-hour recalls provide estimates of group average intakes that are comparable to those obtained with more involved techniques (1). However, the use of a single 24-hour recall has been criticized because it does not provide a reliable estimate of the usual intake of an individual or a reliable description of the distribution of usual intakes of a population. In the current study we calculated the two major sources of variation in the diet (the intraindividual and interindividual variances) of an elderly population using three 24-hour recalls. Further, we calculated the effect of increasing the number of recalls on variability in the nutrient estimate of this population.


Accession: 002373022

PMID: 1939987



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