+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting the relationship between protein and energy intakes of low-birth-weight infants and the rate and composition of weight gain



Evaluation of a mathematical model for predicting the relationship between protein and energy intakes of low-birth-weight infants and the rate and composition of weight gain



Pediatric Research 35(6): 704-712



A model for predicting the relationship between protein and energy intakes of low-birth-weight (LBW) infants and the rate and composition of weight gain is described. It is based on linear multiple regression equations summarizing the rates of weight gain, nitrogen retention, and energy retention of 101 previously studied LBW infants fed protein intakes ranging from 2.25 to 3.9 g.kg-1.d-1 and concomitant energy intakes ranging from 115 to 147 kcal.kg-1.d-1 plus current theory concerning nutrient retention and body composition. To test the validity of the model, three combinations of protein and energy intake predicted by the model to result in specific rates and compositions of weight gain were fed to 44 LBW infants, and the observed rates of weight gain, protein accretion, and fat accretion were compared with the rates predicted by the model. Differences in these and other outcome variables between two of the groups, the intakes of which differed only in energy, also were compared to provide additional insight into the effect of concomitant energy intake on protein utilization. Across groups, actual outcomes correlated closely with predicted outcomes, supporting the validity of the model for the total population. However, outcomes of individual infants deviated as much as 30% from predicted outcomes; the magnitude of the deviation was independent of birth weight, gestational age, or size for gestational age.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 002374469

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 7936823

DOI: 10.1203/00006450-199406000-00017


Related references

Effect of protein and energy intakes on energy balance nitrogen balance and weight gain composition of low birth weight infants. Pediatric Research 20(4 Part 2): 418A, 1986

Energy expenditure, energy balance, and composition of weight gain in low birth weight infants fed diets of different protein and energy content. Journal of pediatrics 110(5): 753-759, 1987

The effects of varying protein and energy intakes on the growth and body composition of very low birth weight infants. Nutrition Journal 10: 140, 2011

Relationship between energy expenditure and weight gain in very low birth weight infants during the 1st weeks of life. Pediatric Research 14(12): 1421, 1980

In fed formula VLBW infants, is weight gain and weight gain composition related to the protein/energy ratio?. JPGN 31(Suppl. 2): S94, 2000

Nutrient balance, energy utilization, and composition of weight gain in very-low-birth-weight infants fed pooled human milk or a preterm formula. Journal of pediatrics 105(1): 79-85, 1984

Supplementation of pooled human milk with casein hydrolysate: energy and nitrogen balance and weight gain composition in very low birth weight infants. Pediatric Research 21(5): 458-461, 1987

Equation for predicting weight gain in very low-birth-weight infants. American Journal of Perinatology 15(2): 141-144, 1998

Body composition, weight gain composition, and energy and protein requirements for the fattening of Zebu steers. II. Weight gain composition Carcass specific gravity, Brazil.1. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Zootecnia0(2): 188-194, 1981

Effect of gender on weight gain and its composition in low birth weight infants. Pediatric Research 45(4 Part 2): 283A, 1999

Effect of Gender on Weight Gain and Its Composition in Low Birth Weight (LBW) Infants. Pediatric Research 45(4, Part 2 of 2): 283a-283a, 1999

First-week protein and energy intakes are associated with 18-month developmental outcomes in extremely low birth weight infants. Pediatrics 123(5): 1337-1343, 2009

Effects of varying protein and energy intakes on growth and metabolic response in low birth weight infants. Journal of pediatrics 108(6): 955-963, 1986

First-Week Protein and Energy Intakes Are Associated With 18-Month Developmental Outcomes in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants. Yearbook of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine 2010: 262-263, 2010

Energy storage nitrogen retention and weight gain in low birth weight infants fed human milk or formula. Pediatric Research 16(4 Part 2): 314A, 1982