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Genetic evaluation for additive and dominance effects by animal models and its effect on genetic gains in a small MOET beef cattle population



Genetic evaluation for additive and dominance effects by animal models and its effect on genetic gains in a small MOET beef cattle population



Animal Science & Technology 64(7): 669-677



Simulated selection and mating was carried out in a small MOET beef cattle population with a gene effect model to examine the effect of dominance deviations on genetic gains. The population was assumed to have overlapping generations, and to be composed of 60 animals in each generation. A trait, such as growth trait, was assumed to be recorded in both sexes, and controlled by 64 loci with both additive and dominance effects. Gene frequencies of the favorable alleles were set at 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8 to study the effect of gene frequency. Heritability in the broad sense, was set at 0.60. Each donor produced four progenies by MOET per generation. Five males and 15 females were selected on breeding values predicted by animal model BLUP taking into account only additive effects or additive and dominance effects at each generation, for six generations. It was concluded that highly accurate predictions of breeding values with only small bias may be obtained by using a model that accounts for dominance effects. This result is most clearly observed when gene frequency is moderate, that is, when selection was carried out in a population originated from cross breeding. This model may be expected to increase genetic gains slightly. Therefore it appears necessary to account for dominance effects, if calculation time is available and costs are reasonable, when selection is carried out in a MOET population.

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