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Intraseminal fungal location in maize of selected seed storage fungi in relation to some physiological parameters


South African Journal of Botany 58(3): 139-144
Intraseminal fungal location in maize of selected seed storage fungi in relation to some physiological parameters
Maize seeds that had been hot-water-treated (30 min at 55.degree. C) to reduce inherent infection, were inoculated with the spores of four storage fungal species of varying xerotolerance. The less xerotolerant species (Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sydowi) were characterized by vigorous growth on the six single carbon source media tested, and were also associated with rapid and estensive degradation of all the seed tissues. The more exotolerant species (Aspergillus chevalieri and Penicillium pinophilum), on the other hand, grew only slowly in vitro and were not located in the embryo despite six weeks storage of the artificially infected seeds at 95% relative humidity. Germinability of infected seeds decreased with storage time, as did the dry mass of the resultant seedlings, the extent of the decline increasing with decreasing xerotolerance of the fungal species. The rate of infection of, and ultimate mycelial location in, the seeds are suggested to be related to the extracellular enzyme capabilities of the individual species.


Accession: 002416216

DOI: 10.1016/s0254-6299(16)30858-4



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